Can hydroxychloroquine be used for pneumonia

Discussion in 'Canadian Pharcharmy Online' started by jakZa, 10-Mar-2020.

  1. Jedai Moderator

    Can hydroxychloroquine be used for pneumonia


    Hydroxychloroquine is available as the brand-name drug Plaquenil. Generic drugs usually cost less than the brand-name version. Hydroxychloroquine may be used as part of a combination therapy.

    Plaquenil sun Can i stop taking plaquenil Can plaquenil make viruses last linger Silver chloroquine

    Plaquenil hydroxychloroquine "been taking Plaquenil for RA for around 6 months then about 3 weeks ago started having muscular pain, not as bad as the joint pain I used to have but enough to be concerned. muscle weakness, painful, as if I worked out for 2 hours praying it is a dosage problem" Find patient medical information for Hydroxychloroquine Oral on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, interactions, pictures, warnings and user ratings. Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil is a drug that is classified as an anti-malarial drug. Plaquenil is prescribed for the treatment or prevention of malaria. It is also prescribed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and the side effects of lupus such as hair loss, joint pain, and more.

    Hydroxychloroquine is used to treat lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. It isn’t fully understood how this drug works to treat lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. That means you may need to take it with other drugs. It treats malaria by killing the parasites that cause the disease.

    Can hydroxychloroquine be used for pneumonia

    Hydroxychloroquine Oral Route Before Using - Mayo Clinic, Hydroxychloroquine Oral Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures.

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  4. Description and Brand Names. Drug information provided by IBM Micromedex US Brand Name. Plaquenil; Descriptions. Hydroxychloroquine is used to treat malaria. It is also used to prevent malaria infection in areas or regions where it is known that other medicines eg, chloroquine may not work.

    • Hydroxychloroquine Oral Route Description and Brand Names..
    • Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil Side Effects & Dosage for Malaria.
    • Breakthrough Chloroquine phosphate shows efficacy in COVID-19..

    Hydroxychloroquine is in a class of drugs called antimalarials. It is used to prevent and treat acute attacks of malaria. It is also used to treat discoid or systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis in patients whose symptoms have not improved with other treatments. Safety of Long term use of Hydroxychloroquine Therapy Further Verified for People with Lupus Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil® was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for symptoms of lupus. The greatest concern people with lupus have when taking hydroxychloroquine is related to vision and an increase in risk for retinal damage. Efficacy and Safety of Hydroxychloroquine for Treatment of Pneumonia Caused by 2019-nCoV HC-nCoV Description There is no vaccine or antiviral treatment for human coronavirus, so this study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of pneumonia caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus.

     
  5. AlexSuv Well-Known Member

    Hydroxychloroquine is used to treat or prevent malaria, a disease caused by parasites that enter the body through the bite of a mosquito. Hydroxychloroquine SULFATE - Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil Side Effects & Dosage for. Hydroxychloroquine Professional Patient Advice -
     
  6. slavyanych Well-Known Member

    10 mg (conventional) PO q8hr or 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily initially; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN Maintenance: 10-20 mg (conventional) PO q8hr up to 20-30 mg PO q6-8hr; not to exceed 180 mg/day (conventional) or 120 mg/day (extended release) 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN; not to exceed 90 mg/day (Adalat CC) or 120 mg/day (Procardia XL) 30 mg (extended-release) PO q12hr; may be increased to 120-240 mg/day (monitor) 30-120 mg (extended release) PO once daily 0.2% topical gel/ointment (extemporaneously compounded) q12hr for 3-6 weeks 20 mg sublingual Peritoneal dialysis (PD) or hemodialysis (HD): Supplemental dose not necessary Cirrhosis: Consider dose adjustment Take on empty stomach Avoid conventional (ie, immediate-release) product; potential for hypotension and risk of precipitating myocardial ischemia 10 mg (conventional) PO q8hr or 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily initially; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN Maintenance: 10-20 mg (conventional) PO q8hr up to 20-30 mg PO q6-8hr; not to exceed 180 mg/day (conventional) or 120 mg/day (extended release) 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN; not to exceed 90 mg/day (Adalat CC) or 120 mg/day (Procardia XL) Adverse effects differ between short-acting (conventional) and extended-release formulations, with the conventional preparations having more serious adverse drug reactions in some cases Peripheral edema (10-30%) Dizziness (23-27%) Flushing (23-27%) Headache (10-23%) Heartburn (11%) Nausea (11%) Muscle cramps (8%) Mood change (7%) Nervousness (7%) Cough (6%) Dyspnea (6%) Palpitations (6%) Wheezing (6%) Hypotension, transient (5%) Urticaria (2%) Pruritus (2%) Constipation ( Hypersensitivity to nifedipine or other calcium-channel blockers Cardiogenic shock Concomitant administration with strong CYP3A4 inducers (eg, rifampin, rifabutin, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, St John's wort) significantly reduces nifedipine efficacy Immediate release preparation (sublingually or orally) for urgent or emergent hypertension Use with caution in (≤4 weeks) myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure (CHF), advanced aortic stenosis, peripheral edema, symptomatic hypotension, unstable angina, concurrent use of beta blockers, hepatic or renal impairment, persistent progressive dermatologic reactions, exacerbation of angina (during initiation of treatment, after a dose increase, or after withdrawal of beta blocker) Short-acting nifedipine may be less safe than other calcium-channel blockers in management of angina, hypertension, or acute MI Use cautiously in combination with quinidine Conventional (short-acting) form not indicated for hypertension Use extended-release form with caution in severe GI stenosis; rare reports of GI obstructive symptoms in patients with known strictures or without history of GI obstruction in association with ingestion of long-acting nifedipine; bezoars can occur in very rare cases and may necessitate surgical intervention Extended-release form contains lactose; thus, patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance, Lapp lactase deficiency, or glucose-galactose malabsorption should not take this medicine Cirrhosis: Clearance reduced and systemic exposure increased CYP3A inhibitors (eg, ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole clarithromycin, erythromycin, grapefruit, nefazodone, saquinavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir) may inhibit nifedipine metabolism and result in increased exposure when coadministered Strong CYP3A inducers (eg, rifampin, rifabutin, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and St John’s wort) may enhance nifedipine metabolism and result in decreased exposure when coadministered Avoid use in heart failure due to lack of benefit, and/or worse outcomes with calcium channel blockers in general Use with caution in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and outflow tract obstruction; reduction in afterload may worsen symptoms associated with this condition Avoid use of immediate release formulation in the elderly; may cause hypotension and risk precipitating myocardial ischemia Pregnancy category: C Lactation: Drug is distributed into breast milk; manufacturer suggests discontinuing drug or refraining from nursing (however, American Academy of Pediatrics states that drug is safe for nursing) A: Generally acceptable. Contact the applicable plan provider for the most current information. Hydroxychloroquine Uses, Dosage & Side Effects - Confirmed Gluten-Free Drugs and Medications - Celiac Disease Procardia, Procardia XL nifedipine dosing, indications.
     
  7. Spielberg New Member

    Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil Toxicity and Recommendations. Diagnosis Hydroxychloroquine-induced retinal toxicity Discussion. Chloroquine CQ and hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil HCQ have been used for many years, initially for the treatment of malaria but now more commonly for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus 1.

    Plaquenil - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
     
  8. mfads User

    Plaquenil and. diarrhea! rheumatoid I’ve been on plaquenil for almost 3 years and I still have diarrhea and to a lesser extent heartburn and nausea sometimes. The first year or two I was on plaquenil I didn’t have a normal bowel movement for as long as I could remember and was constantly nauseous and could barely eat.

    Taking Plaquenil for Rheumatoid Arthritis